Thierry B Fine Art: Art Appreciation 101

Why does art matter?? For without perspective, life would be awfully dull!  It is our most expressive form of sharing. Art matters because it illustrates the human experience—the wonder of it, the bewilderment of it, the whimsy of it, and so much more. We would not be connected so deeply without the existence of art

The arts matter because they help us see the world from different perspectives. They give us empathy and help us understand people, places, periods of history, and issues with which we may otherwise be unfamiliar. They comfort us in grief and energise us in celebration. They are important because they can act as a catalyst for change…they can start a revolution! The arts ignite something in our brains that I can’t explain, but I know it’s essential for life.

Above: Artwork by painter Michael Whitehead, Document, 2018, Mixed Media on Linen, 150 x 200cm. Interior styling courtesy of Melissa Gries of Zenza Interiors.

Are you a newbie to the art of collecting? Here is a substantial reason how you can start your very own art collection! Post October this year, if you have a registered ABN for a business which is turning over under $10million annually, an art work upto $20,000 will be fully tax deductible under current ATO regulations.

So effectively, you could purchase 5 x paintings at $20,000 each & have something to show for $100,000 taxable amount owing. No better time to invest in an art collection! Read more HERE by arts accountant specialist & valuer, Michael Fox regarding the recent ATO updates.

Above: Artwork by painter Michael Whitehead, Manuscript, 2018, Mixed Media on Linen, 180 x 210cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

Above: Artwork by painter Michael Whitehead, Haven, 2018, Mixed Media on Linen, 180 x 210cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

Above: Artwork by Patricia Heaslip, Walk In Silence, Oil on Canvas, 122 x 122cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

Above: Artwork by Thierry B., Nuanced, 2018 – Dreamscape series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Canvas, 137.5 x 180.5cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

Above: Artwork by Thierry B., Fairytale, 2018 Dreamscape Series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

Above: Artwork by Wilson Lin, The Things We Do For Love, Fractal Series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Canvas, 183 x 274.5cm (triptych). Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

Above: Artwork by Wilson Lin, Fresh Strike, 2018, Fractal Series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Canvas, 170 x 250cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

Above: Artwork by Thierry B., Mindful Moments, 2018 Dreamscape Series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

Above: Artwork by Patricia Heaslip, Landlines, Oil on Linen, 183 X 183cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

Above: Artwork by Thierry B., Entanglement, 2018 Coral Series, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

Above: Artwork by Thierry B.,Voyage, 2018,Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 91.5cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

Above: Artwork by Thierry B.,The Deep Blue, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 183cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

Above: Artwork by Thierry B.Starling Zen-sation, 2016,Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 183cm. Price on Application: art@thierrybfineart.com

If you have a registered ABN for a business which is turning over under $10million annually, an art work upto $20,000 will be fully tax deductible under current ATO regulations. So effectively, you could purchase 5 x paintings at $20,000 each & have something to show for $100,000 taxable amount owing. No better time to invest in an art collection! Read more HERE by arts accountant specialist & valuer, Michael Fox regarding the recent ATO updates.

The Thierry B Fine Art website offers a complete stockroom to view available works, interior pages with the paintings installed into their new homes for inspiration, in addition to a testimonial page which sounds positively smarmy – every word is true!!! We look forward to welcoming you into our bespoke gallery space, complete with oversize stockroom for your viewing pleasure.

Thierry B Fine Art  is located @ 473 Malvern Rd, South Yarra. Gallery hours: Monday – Saturday 11am – 5pm & Sunday 12pm – 5pm or by appointment via art@thierrybfineart.com




Thierry B Fine Art: Y-ello? Is It Me You're Looking For??

Finally the layers come off, our winter coats are swapped for lighter moments of turning our faces toward the sun again and soaking up all that luminous sunshine, blue skies, chirping birdies and the scent of flowers and bees busily humming. Not a moment too soon either, as Melbournians, we are well within our right to celebrate the joy that spring brings when it has indeed sprung!!

So too, new arrivals of sparkling and just-dried varnished art works jostle for position in our 500+ strong painting filled bespoke stock room. Wilson Lin has delivered a new fractal series, as has Phonsay, with some knock-your-socks-off hyper-realist paintings. Master painter, Thierry B. has been installing freshly framed creations onto the gallery walls for art collectors to snap up for their spaces at home or surround themselves with inspiring paintings whilst at work.

 Above: Wilson Lin,  The Things We Do For Love , Fractal Series, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 274.5cm, P.O.A

Above: Wilson Lin, The Things We Do For Love, Fractal Series, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 274.5cm, P.O.A

 Above: Wilson Lin,  Fresh Strike , Fractal series, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 170 x 250cm, P.O.A

Above: Wilson Lin, Fresh Strike, Fractal series, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 170 x 250cm, P.O.A

Above: Artist, Wilson Lin painting in his studio in Melbourne, 2018.

 Above: Thierry B.,  Voyage , 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 91.5cm, P.O.A

Above: Thierry B., Voyage, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 91.5cm, P.O.A

 Above: Thierry B.,  The Deep Blue , Coral Series, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 183cm, P.O.A

Above: Thierry B., The Deep Blue, Coral Series, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 183cm, P.O.A

 Above: Abstract Expressionist artist Thierry B., pictured in his gallery with painting, Z ensation , 2017, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 183cm, P.O.A

Above: Abstract Expressionist artist Thierry B., pictured in his gallery with painting, Zensation, 2017, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 183cm, P.O.A

How many Abstract painters can confidently say, their oeuvre encompasses twenty-seven (27!!) different styles available to his clientele?! So much of Thierry B's art can be traced and talked about in terms of intention. The use of repetition in mark making, draws the viewer into the picture plane. It can be seen as metaphor for making his mark upon the world on a physical scale. Lyrical and delicate imagery, these fluid shapes transform spaces they inhabit. Hypnotic and healing, many of  Thierry B's series have been widely collected and photographed in private collections across Australia and overseas.

 Above: Thierry B.,  A Fine Romance , Dreamscape Series, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm, P.O.A

Above: Thierry B., A Fine Romance, Dreamscape Series, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm, P.O.A

 Above: Thierry B.,  Tenderness , 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm, P.O.A

Above: Thierry B., Tenderness, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm, P.O.A

 Above: Thierry B.,  La Vie En Rose , Euphoria Series, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm, P.O.A

Above: Thierry B., La Vie En Rose, Euphoria Series, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm, P.O.A

Thierry B Fine Art represents some of Australia’s best-loved Abstract artists as they explore and celebrate colour, layers of texture and movement.

Thierry B explains the art of zen; "My work is all about introducing the joy of colour into our lives, often seen here through cross-sections which challenge your spatial perception. The vibrancy of hue and curvilinear forms in repetition create a dynamic feast for the eye, where they are in constant motion. Energy maps a pathway for our eyes and hearts to meld." - Thierry B, July 2018.

 Above: Hyper-realism artist, Phonsay painting in his Albury-based studio.

Above: Hyper-realism artist, Phonsay painting in his Albury-based studio.

 Above: Phonsay,  Desert Storm , 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 91.5 x 122cm, P.O.A. Framed in 18 carat white-gold water-gilding with ornate white custom-made frame.

Above: Phonsay, Desert Storm, 2018, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 91.5 x 122cm, P.O.A. Framed in 18 carat white-gold water-gilding with ornate white custom-made frame.

If you have a registered ABN for a business which is turning over under $10million annually, an art work upto $20,000 will be fully tax deductible under current ATO regulations.

The Thierry B Fine Art website offers a complete stockroom to view available works, interior pages with the paintings installed into their new homes for inspiration, in addition to a testimonial page which sounds positively smarmy - every word is true!!! We look forward to welcoming you into our bespoke gallery space, complete with oversize stockroom for your viewing pleasure.

The gallery is located @ 473 Malvern Rd, South Yarra. Gallery hours: Monday - Saturday 11am - 5pm & Sunday 12pm - 5pm or by appointment.

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Thierry B Fine Art: A Few Of My Favourite Things

In the last post for the year, 2017 has been a rollercoaster ride for many.

I for one, am looking forward to a complete summer break with my favourite little peeps, my twin 8 year old's.

 It's all about having fun and being in the moment, taking our time, and few plans except soaking up the much-needed sunshine and feeling the sand between our toes in between bouts of body surfing.

I'd like to take this opportunity to thank Thierry B Fine Art's valued clientele for their ongoing support throughout 2017.

We'd also like to thank our behind-the scenes-colleagues who logistically make it all possible to keep up the pace, as one of Australia's busiest commercial art galleries.

Here are a few of my favourite things below!!!

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Genevieve Kamara Loy, #GKL18:1117 FDA2017, Acrylic On Belgian Linen, 122 x 182cm, $11,000.jpg
Katarra Butler Napaltjarri #KTB 21:1216  FDA2016, $25,000, jpg.jpg
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Octobre a Ceret,152 x 137CM $9,900.jpg
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Universalist 122 x 91.5cm.JPG
Thierry B. %22I Keep On Loving You More%22 - Synthetic Polymer Paint On Canvas 122 x 183 cm - $11,000 .jpg
Patricia Heaslip Landlines 183 x 183cm $15,000.JPG
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As we countdown the last 6 days until we close the gallery for our break, our gallery hours include Monday - Saturday 11am - 5pm & Sunday 12pm - 5pm or by appointment. Re-opening the 15th January, if you are in town come by and check out our new stockroom full of beautiful paintings.

Have a happy holiday with your loved ones of near and far, and return next year in good health, ready for an even bigger and better 2018!!

Lots of love, Thierry & Vicki

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Thierry B Fine Art: Monochromatic Schematic

With art we travel. What leads us to search out meaning for the walls of our inner harbours and our exterior retreats? What combination of space, surface and colour lead us to a feeling of extended openness, of belonging to our surroundings, of expansion of space and the glimmer of inexplicable lightness.

As we travel through architectural spaces, designed places - the search for the spontaneous and the desirable, and at times the spiritual, can often be mirrored in how we choose to demarcate our ideologies of place.

 Above: Thierry B mentors Abstract artist  Wilson Lin  in the Huntingdale studio, Melbourne.

Above: Thierry B mentors Abstract artist Wilson Lin in the Huntingdale studio, Melbourne.

Pictured here is abstract artist, Wilson Lin working in his Huntingdale studio, alongside mentor, Thierry B. Originally born in Taiwan, Lin's paintings have been exhibited in Taiwan and Hong Kong as well as represented in Melbourne at Thierry B Fine Art over the past five years. A student of Thierry B’s, Wilson shares studio space in Huntingdale with him, learning to focus his creativity from a Zen perspective, Buddhist in essence. The pattern-making and repetition of line in his works create a vortex and restful space for the viewer all at once. Lin’s paintings are now highly sought after and collected Australia wide and gaining notoriety internationally.

 Above: Wilson Lin,  A Glimmering Sheet , Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 91.5cm, P.O.A

Above: Wilson Lin, A Glimmering Sheet, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 91.5cm, P.O.A

 Above: Wilson Lin,  Silver Lining , Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm, P.O.A  Sculpture pictured by Lachlan Ross,  Eternity , 2016,  Stainless Steel on wooden plinth, P.O.A

Above: Wilson Lin, Silver Lining, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm, P.O.A

Sculpture pictured by Lachlan Ross, Eternity, 2016,  Stainless Steel on wooden plinth, P.O.A

 Above: Thierry B,  Contrast , 2016, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 183cm, P.O.A

Above: Thierry B, Contrast, 2016, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 183cm, P.O.A

Thierry B explains the art of zen; "My work is all about introducing the joy of colour into our lives, often seen here through cross-sections which challenge your spatial perception. The vibrancy of hue and curvilinear forms in repetition create a dynamic feast for the eye, where they are in constant motion. Energy maps a pathway for our eyes and hearts to meld." - Thierry B, July 2015.

 Above: Thierry B,  Euphoria Series - Blanc , Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 152cm, P.O.A

Above: Thierry B, Euphoria Series - Blanc, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 152cm, P.O.A

 Above: Prolific Abstract Expressionist painter,   Thierry B  in his studio, Huntingdale Melbourne.

Above: Prolific Abstract Expressionist painter,  Thierry B in his studio, Huntingdale Melbourne.

 Above: Lily Kelly Napangati,  Tuli Tuli (Sand Dunes)  2017, Acrylic Paint on Linen, 122 x 212cm, P.O.A

Above: Lily Kelly Napangati, Tuli Tuli (Sand Dunes) 2017, Acrylic Paint on Linen, 122 x 212cm, P.O.A

Lily Kelly Napangati is a highly esteemed artist recognised for her contribution to contemporary aboriginal artwork. With a talent for intricate detail, Lily has captivated audiences with her interpretations of the shifting seasons and changing country.This painting depicts the Tali Tali, (Sand Hills) around the artists traditional country located around Mt.Liebig, Haasts Bluff, Papunya and Kintore. The dotting represents the shifting sands and landscape. This is where Lily's ancestors lived, hunted and gathered food. Ceremonies would be performed at sacred creation sites where young women would learn the mythology of how the land was formed and the creeks, plants and animals came into being.

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Above: Belle magazine features a glamorous interior by David Hicks revealing Thierry B's sonambulistic Euphoria series in wistful white. Measuring 183 x 183cm the painting offers a strong anchor point for this pied-de-terre in Melbourne (see page 114, Aug/Sept Belle Magazine). The Euphoria series has been part of Thierry B's oeuvre and regularly requested by loyal clientele for busy boardrooms and home interiors alike for close to fifteen years.

 

 Above: Jane Valentine,  Shielding I, II, III , Statuario Marble, 100 (h) x 90 (w) x 25 (d) cm, P.O.A

Above: Jane Valentine, Shielding I, II, III, Statuario Marble, 100 (h) x 90 (w) x 25 (d) cm, P.O.A

One of the earliest art forms, sculpture still carries the imprint of artisan knowledge passed down through centuries. Yet while Valentine’s practice honours and continues many traditional methods, she is very much a 21st-century practitioner, excited by technology and operating globally, sourcing her materials, her working spaces and conversations all over the world. “I work with whatever technology I can take; and I work some pieces just by hand. That’s amazing – and even more beautiful when you’re working more intuitively and you don’t know what the end product is going tobe.” Now, she says, working like that is “something that I give myself as a gift”. “Part of my artistic practice tries to get to the essence of things and that’s often a pure, fragile, feminine essence.”

 Above: Jane Valentine,  Shielding I, II, III , Statuario Marble, 100 (h) x 90 (w) x 25 (d) cm, P.O.A

Above: Jane Valentine, Shielding I, II, III, Statuario Marble, 100 (h) x 90 (w) x 25 (d) cm, P.O.A

There’s a famous Michelangelo quote about the statue concealed in each block of vstone and the sculptor’s task of revealing it. In Valentine’s concentration as she listens - leaning in to catch anything obscured beneath the stones of a conversation’s words - you sense the focus with which she seeks out her marble and its internal potential. “It’s better to go when it’s just been raining and there’s early morning light,” she saysof these excursions. “You have to tap marble, it sings, so you’re looking for the appropriate pitch.” All in a days work for widely collected and revered sculptor, Jane Valentine.

As potential collector and client of Thierry B Fine Art, we are excited to offer Autralia-wide complimentary delivery to your home or business address. To place your order, email art@thierrybfineart.com or call directly on: +613 9827 7756. Thierry B Fine Art is located at 473 Malvern Rd, South Yarra.

Gallery hours: Monday – Saturday, 11am – 5pm, Sunday 12pm-5pm or by appointment: 0404 861 438.

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Thierry B Fine Art: The Winds of Change

I love it when the spring shifts ever so slightly into summery mode. If you are based in Melbourne, Australia - you may also have taken note & fished out your sandals last week when the mercury hit 31 degrees two days, back-to-back. Alas, as optimistic as even the most seasoned veteran of our blink-and -you'll-miss- it weather down south, we are back to halcyon high-wind days filled with woeful hay fever and awful allergies fluttering through our day. 

Summer, where are you?? Please hurry! We miss you and want you back!

 Above: Thierry B,  On The Rise , Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 152cm, P.O.A.

Above: Thierry B, On The Rise, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 183 x 152cm, P.O.A.

 Michelle Breton,  Honey Dreaming , Mixed media on Canvas, 137 x 153cm, P.O.A

Michelle Breton, Honey Dreaming, Mixed media on Canvas, 137 x 153cm, P.O.A

 Above: Patricia Heaslip,  Landlines,  Oil on Canvas, 183 x 183cm, P.O.A

Above: Patricia Heaslip, Landlines, Oil on Canvas, 183 x 183cm, P.O.A

 Above: Thierry B,  Satisfaction,  Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 91.5cm, P.O.A.

Above: Thierry B, Satisfaction, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 91.5cm, P.O.A.

Even As I thumb through my latest novel, Honey, Baby, Sweetheart by Deb Caletti, I am willing the weather toward sunshiney days/daze: "Summer, after all, is a time when wonderful things can happen to quiet people. For those few months, you're not required to be who everyone thinks you are, and that cut-grass smell in the air and the chance to dive into the deep end of a pool give you a courage you don't have the rest of the year. You can be grateful and easy, with no eyes on you, and no past. Summer just opens the door and lets you out."

 Above: Thierry B,  Submerged,  Synthetic Polymer Paint On Linen 184 x 153 cm,  P.O.A

Above: Thierry B, Submerged, Synthetic Polymer Paint On Linen 184 x 153 cm,  P.O.A

 Above: Thierry B,  Effervescence,  Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen,    122 x 168cm, P.O.A

Above: Thierry B, Effervescence, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen,  122 x 168cm, P.O.A

 Above: Michelle Breton  Trompette au Soleil,  Mixed Media on Canvas, 153 x 137cm, P.O.A

Above: Michelle Breton Trompette au Soleil, Mixed Media on Canvas, 153 x 137cm, P.O.A

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I also feel I need to tell you that I started the day by ordering at my local cafe Mr.Brightside a plate of summer! I couldn't go past their special menu which had got a little summer make over today. This is Challah French Toast with raspberry mascarpone, fresh berries and maple. Never one to do things half-heartedly, I added a berry smoothy in for good measure! So delicious. Now all we need are some seriously good sunsets beachside , with some Frose or Negroni spritzers & we're talking!!

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Inspired by this sunset snap last week (above), I throw it out to the weather gods that be - summer where for art thou?!! If I cannot bask in the light of a shimmering summer day, than I will go in search of finding other ways to bring the energy inwards - paintings perform this function. They engage and enliven a previously empty space, lending it life and an anchor for your gaze. Take a closer look at the new offerings by Australian talent we have in the gallery stockroom now to view.

 Above: Michelle Breton ,   Octobre a Ceret  ,    Mixed Media on Canvas, 152 x 137cm, P.O.A

Above: Michelle Breton, Octobre a Ceret, Mixed Media on Canvas, 152 x 137cm, P.O.A

 Patricia Heaslip,  The Essences , Oil On Canvas, 152.5 x 106 cm, P.O.A.

Patricia Heaslip, The Essences, Oil On Canvas, 152.5 x 106 cm, P.O.A.

 Patricia Heaslip,  Fortitude , Oil On Canvas, 183 x 183cm, P.O.A.

Patricia Heaslip, Fortitude, Oil On Canvas, 183 x 183cm, P.O.A.

 Above: Michelle Breton,  Rising Candy , Mixed Media on Canvas, 183 x 152cm, P.O.A

Above: Michelle Breton, Rising Candy, Mixed Media on Canvas, 183 x 152cm, P.O.A

As potential collector and client of Thierry B Fine Art, we are excited to offer Autralia-wide complimentary delivery to your home or business address.

To place your order, email art@thierrybfineart.com or call directly on: +613 9827 7756.               Thierry B Fine Art is located at 473 Malvern Rd, South Yarra.

Gallery hours: Monday – Saturday, 11am – 5pm, Sunday 12pm-5pm or by appointment: 0404 861 438.

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Thierry B Fine Art: JAHM House Museum Tour

  Above:  JAHM Leah & Charles Justin are very welcoming and warmly share their art treasure trove with their visitors.

Above: JAHM Leah & Charles Justin are very welcoming and warmly share their art treasure trove with their visitors.

Today Thierry B Fine Art celebrates 16 years in the business of beautifying the world! Adding authenticity by placing art work into your environment, whether it be home or work – envelops and defines who we are and what we show shapes and reveals what moves us. We paid a visit to Melbourne’s most recent house-museum addition, JAHM.

Charles and Leah Justin have been collecting contemporary art for over 40 years. Today, they live together with their artworks in the Justin Art House Museum (JAHM) with an aspiration to provide a distinctive experience for visitors, that is also intimate and personal. Their fantastic collection has a strong focus on the theme of‘Space’ – reflecting the architectural background of Charles Justin. Consisting of a diverse spectrum of art practices, the collection has a strong emphasis on digital and video work. Like other house museums, JAHM reflects the persona and direction of the Justins, DIGITAL – The World of Alternate Realities”, explores how our contemporary lives straddle the real, the virtual and unreal.

The creation of a house museum was the confluence of several factors. "We started visiting smaller private museums and enjoyed the more intimate experience and seeing different art. Charles was retiring from his architectural practice. Our collection had outgrown our home, which was also not suited to our life as we grew older. We visited the Lyon Housemuseum here in Melbourne, which was the tipping point. We then decided to build a customised house museum where we could share our collection and love of art with the public.” – Charles Justin.

  Above:  JAHM Co-Director, Charles Justin addresses visitors to current exhibition, Digital – The World of Alternative Realities.

Above: JAHM Co-Director, Charles Justin addresses visitors to current exhibition, Digital – The World of Alternative Realities.

According to Professor Tim Flannery, from the Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute, Melbourne University, we only need to reflect on the way that the net and social media are influencing our lives to understand how digital technologies are profoundly altering how we relate to each other, and the world. But over coming decades digital technologies will extend their reach into transport (via driverless electric vehicles), medical care (via robotics), our relationship with the natural world (through webcam), and the wellsprings of human creativity, through the creation of digital art.

“Digital art throws up many questions beyond that of where the act of artistic creation lies. Purchase a work of digital art, and you are likely to receive a small box, inside of which nestles a nicely fetishized memory stick containing the blueprint for the work. I imagine that it’s quite a different experience from purchasing a canvas. And while a work on canvas can be stored away and only infrequently viewed, the digital work doesn’t exist until its digital information is manifested by a machine.

The high fidelity of digital art also sets it apart. It is the work of seconds to replicate with high fidelity the blueprint for an artwork stored on a memory stick. So what does it mean to own an ‘original’ work of digital art? Analog art of course faces its own issues in this regard. Photographs of works on canvas abound, but it takes a talented forger to faithfully replicate a painting. In the newly emerging sharing economy, such distinctions may not matter that much. But in the existing world of conventional art, with its emphasis on authenticity, it presents a conundrum.

One indisputable advantage of digital art, however, is its information density and therefore potential for fine granularity. In principal, this allows digital art to mimic nature in the detail it is capable of representing. And in the right hands, such fine granularity has the potential to create aesthetic and compelling works.”

  Above:  Peter Daverington  Spatial Labyrinth , 2010. Image courtesy the artist and  ArcOne  Gallery.

Above: Peter Daverington Spatial Labyrinth, 2010. Image courtesy the artist and ArcOne Gallery.

This digital print of a labyrinthine space with its intersecting planes, frames and stairs presents a disconcerting Escher like quality of space with no beginning and no end. A space is conjured rather similar to that of a renovated warehouse. Is this a commentary on the type of buildings and cities we live in? Evolving his trademark painterly visual codes of landscape, architecture and geometries of space, Daverington continues his exploration into the collapse of traditional western symbols of landscape—informed by the traditions of the Italian Renaissance and German Romanticism. Flights of steps float, translucent in space, while columns and frames hint at structural elements.

Currently his paintings play with ideas of hyper-dimensionality, infinity and landscape by using perspective and architecture as a conceptual trigger to enter the imagined architectonics of the painted surface. The landscape is often referenced as a site for containing the endless conflict of meaning and information within the cultural histories of religion, science and technology. Within this context the landscape is seen not only as a physical subject but a psychological one as well, a multi-layered collage of information which demonstrates the importance on making visible a system rather than simply creating a composition.

  Above:  Ollie Lucas,  Travelling Matter , 2015. Image courtesy the Artist.

Above: Ollie Lucas, Travelling Matter, 2015. Image courtesy the Artist.

These works have been created bythe artist digitally and although they have the character of abstract expressionist paintings, they have in fact been created on computer, blurring the boundary between the traditional handmade painting and the machine made artwork. Perth born and Melbourne based digital artist Oliver Lucas focuses on the information age and it’s
impact on large cities. In particular, central urban areas such as Federation Square, Times Square, Moscow’s Red Square and Shibuya. These spaces offer a work place, a festive space, a physical location and a hyperreal site for information-exchange, all at once. Inspiration through colourful advertising and neon cityscapes and has led to a creative take on the industrial function of coloured flags and signals that direct travel of trains, planes and ships, known as semaphores. Lucas harnesses this communicative function to explain new kinds of urban consciousness via constellations of arresting, bright colours and geometric patterns.

  Above:  Paul Snell,  Pulse #201021 , 2012. Image courtesy the Artist and  Langford 120 .

Above: Paul Snell, Pulse #201021, 2012. Image courtesy the Artist and Langford 120.

This work is a further exploration of the artists’ practice in which he digitally deconstructs photographs that he has taken, reassembling these digital components to create a new image. The process of transforming something real into something virtual has parallels in many spheres of life, be it entertainment or genetics.

“As an artist, I am always seeking the point of entry to liminal space, which, for me, is the marker of creative engagement. I start with an idea, I do research and entertain many possibilities, then I withdraw into that “space between” to let everything cook and stew while I seek to become quiet and receptive and balanced.  I stand on the threshold, poised but not ready to commit.  Stepping through the threshold, moving from possibility to a chosen act or decision, always seems the most difficult part – actually stepping through and being willing to choose “this” but not “that” becomes an act of creative courage. Of course, that is only the first step; it is actually a series of decisions, reflections, and more decisions, an ongoing process of stepping into a threshold, a liminal space, then continuing on through the process, over and over again.
 
The space between here and there is often a place of confusion, restlessness, doubt; perhaps even fear. We live most of our lives in this place of uncertainty. We know where we have been and where we are now; we do not know where we will be tomorrow or exactly how we are going to get there. There is a tendency in this uncertain place to rush too quickly into whatever is coming next. We want to make decisions, to be proactive; we have been taught to just do something. There is a sense of urgency in everything we do. Liminal places teach us to let go, relax, and be changed.” – Paul Snell, 2016.

  Above:   Ilan El  has created an illuminated stair over 3 flights comprising  ’39 steps’ . The 4 colour LED lighting to the steps will be interactively activated by the visitors walking up and down the stairs, making the colour and pattern combinations will be unlimited.

Above: Ilan El has created an illuminated stair over 3 flights comprising ’39 steps’. The 4 colour LED lighting to the steps will be interactively activated by the visitors walking up and down the stairs, making the colour and pattern combinations will be unlimited.

  Above:   Shannon McGrath ,  Fraction #3   2014. Image courtesy the Artist.

Above: Shannon McGrathFraction #3  2014. Image courtesy the Artist.

This is a photograph that has been digitally manipulated. It challenges the role of photography that traditionally captured the real. In this work, photography is used for creating the abstract.

  Above:  Catherine Nelson,  Monet’s Garden , 2010.

Above: Catherine Nelson, Monet’s Garden, 2010.

Catherine Nelson is an Australian artist, living in Belgium and the Netherlands,  who uses digital technology as her paintbrush creating landscape ‘paintings’ and animations. “When I embraced the medium of photography, I felt that taking a picture that represented only what was within the frame of the lens wasn’t expressing my personal and inner experience of the world around me. With the eye and training of a painter and with years of experience in film visual effects behind me, I began to take my photos to another level.” – Catherine Nelson.

Nelson’s Monet’s Garden (2010) is composed from a photograph of the garden which has been stitched together digitally so that the lily-pond at its centre becomes a sphere surrounded by trees and clouds. Is it a commentary on our compulsion to impose the chaos of gardens on nature? Above all it is a beguilingly beautiful work that comes closest to capturing the illusory beauty of traditional landscape painting, albeit with a Hieronymus Bosch-like touch.

  Above:  Stephen Haley,  One Second (plastic bags 31688) , 2010. Image courtesy the artist and  Mars Gallery .

Above: Stephen Haley, One Second (plastic bags 31688), 2010. Image courtesy the artist and Mars Gallery.

This is a digital print from a series called ‘One Second’, which explores what gets manufactured in the world each second, in this case plastic bags. Haley has used images purchased on the internet to composethe image. This work presents a beautiful illusion of a sunset created by the environmental destructive manufacture of plastic bags, which is a metaphor for the comfortable world that man has created for himself at the expense of the degradation of our planet.

Haley’s One Second (plastic bags 31688) is a visual representation of the number of plastic bags produced every second, and the sunset-like light and thousands of tiny bags gives the image a murkiness evocative of pollution. I find it intriguing that the density of information of digital image-making used in this distinctive way can produce such opposite effects. But where does the creative spark lie? The blueprint for the elements in the work were created by others. Are they merely the equivalent of the pigment a traditional artist uses? Is Haley’s arrangement of them on the page – as well of course as devising the concept of creating art in this way – where the spark lies?

  Stephen Haley,   One second (oil barrels 1146) , 2010. Image courtesy the artist and Mars Gallery

Stephen Haley, One second (oil barrels 1146), 2010. Image courtesy the artist and Mars Gallery

“We do not believe meeting the artist is critical. Nonetheless, we have met the majority of the artists in our collection, and with many of them, we have had very rewarding discussions about their works and art in general. Our view is that, the way we respond to an artwork is not necessarily connected to the artists’ intent in creating the work. Our attitude does not in any way diminish what the artist thinks or feels; it just allows for a broader, richer and more diverse way of interacting with the art.” – Charles Justin

What is most interesting is the constant overlapping between private and public elements. Although it is a house museum, JAHM has a clear gallery space with some artworks on display spread throughout the house (bedrooms, studio, living room, elevator, toilets) where visitors are encouraged to wander. Leah and Charles offer a curated exhibition twice a year, where not only the artwork in the gallery but some of the artwork in their private spaces will change. Having themes or curated exhibitions is a great idea to have regular visitors, but it is also a clear way to explore contemporary art from different perspectives, which after visiting today I could say it is essential to the message they want to communicate. I absolutely love the fact, the Justins collect emerging Australian talent and are driven by their individual vision and personal sensibilities rather than what may appear fashionably ‘collectible’.

The tour ended in a very homely and much appreciated morning tea of with fresh Verbena-Ginger tea in gold patterned Turkish glasscups and a myriad of delicious European cakes and tasty morsels. It was special to be invited into a home where art is valued and upheld as an experience worth sharing communally. Stay tuned for our next visit to another house-museum born via post World War II immigrants finding their feet in the Melbourne modern art scene.

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Thierry B Fine Art: What Makes Contemporary Aboriginal Art?

What Makes Contemporary Aboriginal Art ?

The contradiction of Aboriginal art is that it is both timeless and contemporary at the same time. This duality challenges the Western understanding of the progress of culture and ideas. Since Aboriginal culture is the oldest continuous living culture in the world , her artwork has existed for 40,000 years and is rooted in the human pre-history. Through songs, rituals, dances, storytelling, symbols and meaningful patterns that are being passed on, Aboriginal groups have managed to preserve their culture for thousands of years. When a group of elder desert men first started to paint their cultural heritage using paper and canvas, that was the birth of the movement that much influenced Aboriginal communities and Australian art in general. For the majority of Westerners, this was the first encounter with Aboriginal culture in general. Having a timeless connection to the pre-history and the first inhabitants of the Australian landscape, Aboriginal art has also been perceived as an innovative and iconic art form inherent to Australia.

 Gloria Petyarre, Bush Medicine Leaves, Acrylic on Linen, 204 x 139 cm.

Gloria Petyarre, Bush Medicine Leaves, Acrylic on Linen, 204 x 139 cm.

The Origins of Aboriginal Contemporary Art

The first desert works emerged in Papunya in 1971. A white Australian teacher and art worker Geffrey Bardon who was working in a remote community in Central Australia started an art program with children and elder men in the village. When elder men started to translate their knowledge of traditional folklore onto canvas, this was the birth of the contemporary art movement. Soon after, eleven men have formed a cooperative called Papunya Tula Artists, and the movement started to generate a widespread interest across rural and remote Aboriginal Australia.  Over subsequent decade as many Aboriginal communities contributed with their specific culture and knowledge, these differences developed into different pictorial languages and regional styles emphisizing their diversity. These initial works that include pieces by now famous Aboriginal artists such as Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri and Kaapa Tjampitjinpa, are today considered as the foundation of the contemporary Aboriginal art movement and are accounted as very valuable. The art critic and writer Robert Hughes has described the rise of contemporary Australian Aboriginal Art as ‘the latest great art movement of the twentieth century’.

 Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri, Narripi Worm Dreaming, ADG:845, 1997, 125 x 96cm.

Clifford Possum Tjapaltjarri, Narripi Worm Dreaming, ADG:845, 1997, 125 x 96cm.

The Symbol As a Language

Since Aborigines didn’t have a history of writing, they have a long tradition of communicating their stories and heritage graphically through symbols. This ancient iconography has transferred into contemporary art works. Often reflecting the spiritual traditions, cultural practices and sociopolitical circumstances of indigenous people, stories and symbols vary widely among the diverse Aboriginal cultures. They range from ones derived from the hunting and tracking background portraying animals and humans with marks they leave or certain clan patterns to aspects of their ‘Dreaming’. The Dreamtime is a translation of the Creation time for Aboriginal people, and it provides their identity and the connection to the land. Artists often need a permission to paint certain traditional stories, and this right is inherited.

 Sally Gabori, DulkaWarngiid, 2007, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Canvas, 195 x 610cm. Courtesy of National Gallery of Victoria.

Sally Gabori, DulkaWarngiid, 2007, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Canvas, 195 x 610cm. Courtesy of National Gallery of Victoria.

The Aboriginal Art Today

Contemporary indigenous artists have won many of Australia’s most prominent art prizes not only reserved for indigenous art. Also, Aboriginal artists have represented Australia in the Venice Biennale in 1990 and 1997. Today, Aboriginal art is internationally acclaimed and recognized as fine art. It ranges across a wide variety of mediums from works on paper and canvas to fiber, glass and printmaking. Rooted in traditional iconography, the works are often remarkably modern in design and color. Some of the most prominent names include Clifford Possum TjapaltjarriKaapa TjampitjinpaEmily KngwarreyeLorna Napurrula FencerChristine Napanangka MichaelsRover Thomas and Gloria Petyarre. There has been a number of Aboriginal artists, such as Michael CookWilliam King Jungala or his daughter Sarrita King who have developed a very unique contemporary style combining their Aboriginal heritage with practices and techniques closer to the Western contemporary art. Albert Namatjira, one of the pioneers of Contemporary Aboriginal art, produced western style landscapes different to the traditionalAboriginal art style. On the other hand, there is a number of artists who ethnically and culturally identify as indigenous, but have adopted global art practices and recognizably Western style. Labeling them as Aboriginal artists have caused political controversies and raised questions on conventional notions of what Aboriginal art is.

 Sarrita King, Ancestors, Jap 010912, Acrylic on Linen, 90 x 60 cm.

Sarrita King, Ancestors, Jap 010912, Acrylic on Linen, 90 x 60 cm.

 Sarrita King, Water, Jap-008727, Acrylic on Linen, 230 x 140 cm.

Sarrita King, Water, Jap-008727, Acrylic on Linen, 230 x 140 cm.

Labels and Controversies

It has been widely discussed whether the indigenous art has been commodified by the West and the commercial art world. It has been even suggested that using terms as ‘Aboriginal art’ is intrinsically racistin terms of labeling Aboriginality as ‘other’ compared to the Western norm.  Many contemporary artists who happen to be of Aboriginal descent refuse to be categorized and labeled simply for their ethnicity. This issue has gained great publicity when in 1990s Australia’s most renowned international artist Tracey Moffatt refused to present at the exhibition exclusively Aboriginal, and more recently when acclaimed contemporary artist Richard Bell was awarded the National Aboriginal & Torre Strait Islander Art Award in 2003. It seems that it might be the time that the Western community develops a more sophisticated understanding of the diversity of artists of indigenous descent.

 Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Bush Yam Dreaming, 1994, inscribed verso: #551, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Canvas, 183.0 x 122.0 cm.

Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Bush Yam Dreaming, 1994, inscribed verso: #551, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Canvas, 183.0 x 122.0 cm.

Aboriginal Art in the Art Market

In 2007, the painting Earth’s Creation by Emily Kngwarreye became the first Aboriginal artwork sold for more than $ 1 million. Her use of dots reaches its crescendo in this phase, with dots merging, separating and dominating in various configurations. They fuse together to create planes of colour structured into mobile shapes, or are choreographed to form lines that suggest dance movements. In earlier works they are used to form fine veils that shield secret markings or create shimmering effects reminiscent of the cosmos. Emily’s palette was largely determined by the changing seasons. Dusty browns appear in her canvases during the dry season, and greens appear after the rains, which Emily referred to as ‘green time’. When wildflowers carpeted the desert, she used a spectrum of yellows. The visual intensity of these paintings recalls the work of French colourists Sonia and Robert Delaunay, or even Claude Monet. Yet Emily knew nothing of their work and, while these French modernists explored pure colour as form and subject, Emily’s only subject throughout her life was her ancestral home of Alhalkere. Emily’s “green-time” canvases attest to an unshakable connection between body and country, one that evades iconography yet demands to be felt.

Only a few months after, an epic work Warlugulong by Clifford Possum was sold for $ 2.4 million in Sotheby’s auction in Melbourne. After the initial boom, the market for these works started to struggle due to the issues with authenticity, ownership, exploitation and Australia’s cultural heritage regulation. On the other hand, the first ever sale of Aboriginal art at Sotheby’s London in June 2015 was a huge success showing a sign of renewed interest in this movement. When choosing a piece, the great importance should be placed on the style, medium, status of the artist and age of the artist. With five works being sold for over $100,000, the auction brought in over $ 2 million for 75 lots. As the price of the pieces is rising again, buying Aboriginal art could be a wise investment.

 Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Bush Yam Dreaming, 1994, inscribed verso: #551, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Canvas, 183.0 x 122.0 cm. Image courtesy of Thierry B.

Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Bush Yam Dreaming, 1994, inscribed verso: #551, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Canvas, 183.0 x 122.0 cm. Image courtesy of Thierry B.

Thierry B Fine Art proudly offers Aboriginal art and may be viewed in our gallery stockroom. Gallery hours are: Monday – Saturday 11am – 5pm, Sunday 12pm – 5pm, or by appointment on : +613404861438.

Vicki xx

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Thierry B Fine Art: Art As Therapy

When Oprah expouses the need to be our most authentic selves, to live our 'best life', she is telling us to live from the heart. As children we played inexhaustedly all day long, often forgetting to eat, relishing the intricate game we had concocted before being called in to eat dinner.  Playing may well be our greatest skill. Why then, must we be reminded constantly to re-enact our 'inner child' rather than our 'inner critic'?

Plato once infamously said, "You can discover more about a person in one hour of play than you can in a year of conversations". 

Which got me thinking - how do I play?

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As a child I was an avid drawer, creating elaborate aerial perspectives of my bedroom, my haven from the world. An introverted dreamer, I loved escaping into worlds I festooned with colour and movement on old reams of butchers' paper.

School work then took priority & for several years I forgot I could draw. I suffered my first bout of deep introspection, a.k.a depression aged 15, I painted my walls charcoal grey & the window sills of my bedroom even darker still.

I drew on an easel (same reams of butcher paper) every night after dinner, in graphite, charcoal sticks, chalky pastels, trying to somehow push my feelings through the paper, to the other side where answers would await me. The other side always felt out of reach.

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Until I swapped my drawing apparatus with my bare hands. I bought two blocks of stoneware clay & forged hand-built figures, peeling away the positive until the negative space stood alone and whole.

This felt right, and somehow already known to me. Art enables us to find ourselves and lose ourselves all at the same time. What art offers is space, a certain breathing room for the spirit.

 Above: Georgia O’Keeffe’s  Lake George (formerly Reflection Seascape) , 1922.  Credit All rights reserved, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and Georgia O'Keeffe Museum/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Above: Georgia O’Keeffe’s Lake George (formerly Reflection Seascape), 1922.

Credit All rights reserved, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and Georgia O'Keeffe Museum/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Many people inspire me. American painter, Georgia O'Keefe was emphatic that "I could say things with colour and shape that I couldn't say any other way - things I had no words for".

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Above: Another beam of pure energy and light is the world's oldest yoga instructor, Tao Porchon-Lynch, 98 who says 'the joy of living is right inside you''. 

After teaching for more than 75 years, this spirited yogi started her training in India at the tender age of 8. She swears by the mantra that "anything is possible".

 Above: Jim Carrey in his studio.

Above: Jim Carrey in his studio.

Jim Carrey, recently took up painting to play and explore his emotions in a symphony of colour on canvas. I don't think he cares what he creates particularly - it is simply the act of creating and playing specifically that interests him most.

His 6-minute vimeo entitled I NEEDED COLOUR explains his motivation to explore. The video provides viewers with a brief look into what Carrey’s life is like, and the monumental amount of time and energy that he spends honing his craft, and his drive to do so.

Carrey shows off his various methods of creating artwork: heavy and measured brushstrokes, modelling clay, squeegeeing paint off of canvases, and then pouring paint directly on them.

Kurt Vonnegart's humanist belief shone through his novels which blended science, satire and black comedy. He said, "to practice any art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow. So do it"

 Above: Japanese physician, 105-year-old Dr. Shigeaki Hinohara

Above: Japanese physician, 105-year-old Dr. Shigeaki Hinohara

Japanese physician, 105-year-old Dr. Shigeaki Hinohara, lived a long and extremely full life. The fact that he saw patients until a few months before his death that defies everything we have come to expect of old age.

He headed five foundations in addition to being the president of St Luke’s International Hospital in Tokyo. He was responsible for introducing Japan’s system of comprehensive annual medical check-ups, which have been credited with greatly contributing to the country’s longevity.

How did he manage to live so long and live those years in a state of good health? He didn't follow a sensible diet, but rather kept his physique trim by eating when hunger struck, and slept when he felt tired.

Working 18 hour days, 6 days a week, he seems superhuman surely. His work/life balance was skewed?  Not if you love what you do & share the knowledge, lecturing actively 2-3times weekly. He believed that energy comes from feeling good.

Don't retire, but remain active longer. Mental agility equals well-being. That, and playing like a kid.

“Science alone can’t cure or help people. Science lumps us all together, but illness is individual. Each person is unique, and diseases are connected to their hearts. To know the illness and help people, we need liberal and visual arts, not just medical ones.” 

He believed in the benefit of play with art, musical therapy providing the ideal stimulation to keep illness at bay. Believing life is all about contribution, he held an incredible drive to help people - this is what made life worth living for him.

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Closer to home, Thierry B is a mentor for me in how to live purposefully. His Buddhist beliefs underscore his ability to live life playfully with intention to serve others.

I am appreciative that I get to learn from my work environment from my daily dealings with valued clients. I listen to their needs and together we come up with a solution. The communication I offer is transparent and informative. We are all each others teachers, no matter how large or small the lesson taught.

I have bought two more bags of stoneware clay, dug out my wooden case of sculpting tools. This weekend, I'm gonna play until I feel hungry or the sun sets, whichever comes first. Art as therapy.

Wishing you a playful weekend,

Vicki xx

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Thierry B Fine Art: Ebb and Flow

   Diamond Soul , Oil on Canvas, 183 x 183cm.

Diamond Soul, Oil on Canvas, 183 x 183cm.

   Aether , Oil on Canvas, 183 x 183cm.

Aether, Oil on Canvas, 183 x 183cm.

I have been a long-time admirer of artist Patricia Heaslip. Actually a decade long love affair with her paintings have haunted me with their wistfulness and transcendental gentle waves. A master of the abstract landscape, Heaslip is based in North East Victoria – she lives on a property with neighbours abutting, barely within cooee. Happily at home amongst the native flora and fauna, Trish,  as she asks me to call her, runs a thriving studio practice.

“I met Thierry B over a decade ago, and immediately was drawn to his energy and intention both as an artist and gallery director – I’m grateful to have established a dynamic and transparent relationship, I call him a great friend. He is one of my constant reminders that detachment does indeed, equal flow”. Heaslip will only ever take her brush to canvas when she is has clarified her purpose in that moment and feels present. If painting is a form of mindfulness, then Heaslip has been an ardent and fastidious student.

   Fortitude , Oil on Canvas, 183 x 183cm .

Fortitude, Oil on Canvas, 183 x 183cm.

   Walk In Silence , Oil on Canvas, 168 x 168cm.

Walk In Silence, Oil on Canvas, 168 x 168cm.

This ebb and flow, is an expression which alludes to the inward and outward movement of ocean tides. A recurrent theme in her paintings, Heaslip is quick to reference nature as inspiration.

We are all matter and forms, ephemeral and yet timeless together. Nature is marvellous in all her fecundity – I harness that energy and reveal it in layers through the canvas. While painting, experience thoughts, feelings, and sensations but never judge them.”

Her latest series grace the gallery like a blanket of love. One melon-coloured canvas is entitled “Jubilant” and absolutely exemplifies a happiness and triumph. A part of new Soul series, Heaslip experiments with undulating tone, while all the time flirting with the suggestion of depth of field. It’s a heady and seductive mix of mindful over mayhem. A taming of the soul.

   Monument , Oil on Canvas, 183 x 183cm.

Monument, Oil on Canvas, 183 x 183cm.

   Ruby Soul , Oil on Canvas, 183 x 183cm.

Ruby Soul, Oil on Canvas, 183 x 183cm.

    Jubilant  , Oil on Canvas, 183 x 183cm.

Jubilant, Oil on Canvas, 183 x 183cm.

Heaslip’s jewel-like offerings hold much resonance. Clear with intention, they convey much about its master painter. She brings to her practice a tranparency that alludes many artists. The painting size commands attention, as they stand to attention as sentient sentinals, happy with their pride of place on the gallery wall. Palettes of gradation invite the viewer to look always inward at the maelstorm beneath the calm exterior. Upon closer inspection, the canvases undulate , dance and shimmer with light and love.

     Magnaminous , Oil on Canvas, 183 x 183cm.

 Magnaminous, Oil on Canvas, 183 x 183cm.

    Landlines  , Oil on Canvas, 183 x 183cm.

Landlines, Oil on Canvas, 183 x 183cm.

The paintings are currently available at Thierry B Fine Art, 473 Malvern Rd, South Yarra.

Gallery hours: Monday – Saturday 11am – 5pm, Sunday 12pm – 5pm or by appointment.

Thierry B: 0413 675 466 or Vicki: 0404 861 438.

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Thierry B Fine Art: The Art of Zen

   Little Swale , Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm.

Little Swale, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm.

When I started managing Thierry B's gallery over a year ago, I was stunned to learn he has over a dozen different painting styles. Most artists spend years developing a signature style that becomes their hallmark, or their visual currency. Thierry B has been an abstract painter for over 20 years and a gallery director for 15 years.

A survivor in mindset, he wears a silent badge of inner bravado devoid from ego based practice. A buddhist in essence, he proudly metamorphosises his oeuvre constantly, in keeping with his own exploratative and inquisitive nature. A small space in High St, Prahran turned a healthy business which kept re-inventing itself to surf the waves of recession that saw dozens of competitors shut their doors.

 Master painter,  Thierry B  at work in his Huntingdale studio.

Master painter, Thierry B at work in his Huntingdale studio.

A recent building development saw the gallery swallowed up alongside local stalwart businesses to make room for a multi storey apartment block. Forced to seek potential spaces outside his comfort zone, Thierry B soon realised that change was underfoot - but with his buddhist approach, decided that each negative option was leading us that much closer to securing the right space to be. After a gruelling search, Malvern Rd in South Yarra, adjacent to the boutique Hawksburn village is our new home.

A purpose built space was fitted out from a concrete shell to reveal a living interior ready to showcase and give birth to a new echelon of Abstract paintings. Thierry B's Mindscape series was born alongside this process of rebirth of a gallery space. His paint pouring technique challenges the loss of control as the resin medium employed together with oxygenisation creates a process of 'letting go'.

 Thierry B's  Mindscape Series  at 473 Malvern Rd, South Yarra.

Thierry B's Mindscape Series at 473 Malvern Rd, South Yarra.

   Untitled , Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm.

Untitled, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm.

   Grounded , Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm.

Grounded, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm.

A metaphor for a new chapter in the Thierry B story - the Mindscape series was initiated six months ago and are now proudly on view in the newly-lit space. Informed by Buddhist practice, the medium has it's own mindset and changes rapidly over a 24 hour period then again over a the week it takes to fully dry - revealing a myriad of shapes, colours and patterns in luscious layers. Challenging notions of control and self-expression, this techniques in direct alignment with Thierry B's experience as a painter of Abstract imagery. His detachment from the process equals flow. Self-examination and self-reassurance is required - he has it in spades.

Now working alongside Thierry as the gallery manager, I am absorbing much of the exuberant energy he emanates every second of the day. His work contains his earnest intention and is heavily rooted in the notion of living in the present. Seeing is all about feeling and bridging the connect-the-dots map on the canvas he signposts so succinctly.

   Life Force , Synthetic Polymer Paint on Canvas, 150.5 x 120cm.

Life Force, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Canvas, 150.5 x 120cm.

   Live it Up , Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 183cm.

Live it Up, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 183cm.

   Leave It All Behind , Synthetic Polymer paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm.

Leave It All Behind, Synthetic Polymer paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm.

With art we travel. What leads us to search out meaning for the walls of our inner harbours and our exterior retreats? What combination of space, surface and colour lead us to a feeling of extended openness, of belonging to our surroundings, of expansion of space and the glimmer of inexplicable lightness. As we travel through architectural spaces, designed places - the search for the spontaneous and the desirable, and at times the spiritual, can often be mirrored in how we choose to demarcate our ideologies of place.

Thierry B explains the art of zen; "My work is all about introducing the joy of colour into our lives, often seen here through cross-sections which challenge your spatial perception. The vibrancy of hue and curvilinear forms in repetition create a dynamic feast for the eye, where they are in constant motion. Energy maps a pathway for our eyes and hearts to meld." - July 201

   Since Yesterday , Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 183m.

Since Yesterday, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 122 x 183m.

   A Whiter Shade of Pale , Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm .

A Whiter Shade of Pale, Synthetic Polymer Paint on Linen, 152 x 122cm.

If art and love are man's greatest gifts to himself, then there can be no art without love. Art is always the making of the soul, the craft of human being's touch - which can be corporeal or of the mind and the spirit. Artists are dedicated to putting love into their work, and there's great power in both the human touch and in originality.

Vicki xx

 

 

Thierry B Fine Art: In The Eye of the Beholder

A month ago I moved houses with dozens of boxes, a collection of eclectic mid-century furniture and sentimental chuchkas (keepsakes). I then managed to unpack myself and my 7 year old twins into some semblance of a home before we dashed off to Bali for a mid-winter week siesta. Upon our return, I looked around and sighed - I have so many pieces of art which I have collected over the past two decades including paintings, sculture, and editioned lithographs to name a few.

The walls had just been painted a pristine antique white and were screaming for adornment. I felt overwhelmed with the enormity of where and what to hang. Should I group some framed works and evenly space out the larger paintings across a few rooms? Who Knew what would work best? I consider myself to have a good eye but my pieces had started to look and feel jaded, alongside my furniture.

 A Graeme Altmann oil painting reminiscent of Warrnambool foreshore,  The Passage , sits above the mantle where a Robert Hague sculture on left, entitled  Repose II , sits happily next to an Altmann bronze boat named,  Rabbit Boat , and a classic Georg Jensen vase.

A Graeme Altmann oil painting reminiscent of Warrnambool foreshore, The Passage, sits above the mantle where a Robert Hague sculture on left, entitled Repose II, sits happily next to an Altmann bronze boat named, Rabbit Boat, and a classic Georg Jensen vase.

I then asked Thierry B if he would come to my home and weave his special brand of magic to my new space. He smiled his slow and easy smile and we locked in a time after work one weekday. regrettably, I did think at the time to take some 'before' snaps - because the 'after' effect is so stunning I could hardly believe my eyes!

Thierry suggested that both my main living areas needed to have all walls embellished with paintings, dotted with sculptures put into the mix. I had gingerly placed works where I thought they may work best, he deftly took charge of the situation and placed works where he 'felt' they should be. I use the word 'felt' specifically, for his gift of visualising an empty space complete is based on a clear intuition not measurements. Placement and proportion is key to achieve a wow factor result.

 A grouping of family photographs, my grandparents clock, a wedding gift to them c.1918 sits next to a perspex work by Melbourne artist, Saffron Newey,  After Durer  - all below a Graeme Drendel oil painting entitled,  The Thin Air of Desire.

A grouping of family photographs, my grandparents clock, a wedding gift to them c.1918 sits next to a perspex work by Melbourne artist, Saffron Newey, After Durer - all below a Graeme Drendel oil painting entitled, The Thin Air of Desire.

 

Installing over a few dozen works, Thierry worked steadily and proficiently hang all in under three hours. He re-shuffled several of my smaller pieces of furniture to create a better flow from room to room, whilst still creating delineation between adjacent spaces. On the whole, I have worked with enough designers who like to think they can hang art into spaces. They can't. They don't fully comprehend how a painting can act as a pivotal anchor in a room, whereby the other prices of furniture then magically fall in to place as though they had resided there timelessly and effortlessly.

He also has this neat little trick where he places a regular envelope with a masking tape lip to the wall underneath where he is drilling into to catch all the red dust and keep it from flying in every which direction- cool right?!

 A man with a drill who knows how to wield it!!

A man with a drill who knows how to wield it!!

Making use of existing furniture and accessories by shifting them just so does change the way a room looks and feels -  trust me, I have now experienced what so many of our clients rave about after a visit from master installer, Thierry B. I can wholeheartedly recommend this unique service that we proudly offer through the gallery for all our clients.

Unlike most other galleries, our new stockroom has been purpose-built so as many as 10 people can browse simultaneously in the space without tripping over each other ! Thierry B Fine Art also sends paintings on appro to clients to view in situ to ensure they are delighted with the work in the space. Add complimentary delivery and an infamous Thierry B instal, and your new pieces will look and feel at home.

The gallery is adjacent to the busy Hawksburn village and is now open to visitors 7 days, Monday - Saturday 11am-5pm and Sunday 12pm-5pm. Appointments outside these times can also be made.

Vicki xx